Archive for October, 2019

Hitting the quotation mark

drew-beamer-Vc1pJfvoQvY-unsplash

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Graphic credit: Drew Beamer

I have long been a sucker for quotable quotes. I can’t often remember stories, jokes or movie scenes, but a good quote jumps off the page at me.

As a high school sophomore, I started writing daily inspirational quotes on the white board of my basketball locker room.

My teammates likely thought I was outside my lane; I was just a scrawny bench warmer. But my coach didn’t seem to mind, and for good reason.

Coach was a Pennsylvania native who had come to Nashville to write country music lyrics. When that dream didn’t pan, he became an English department chair.

You read that right. A head varsity basketball coach who served as the English department chair of a 1,500-student high school. He was probably the only one in the country.

In English class Coach introduced us to his favorite quotes, like Booker T. Washington’s, “I shall allow no man to belittle my soul by making me hate him.”

He also had quotes on our locker room walls:

“Nothing great has ever been achieved except by those who dared to believe that something inside them was superior to circumstances.”

And the sign we slapped when we exited the locker room, “Those who work the hardest are the last to surrender.”

I drew many of my white board lines from a motivational book for young athletes that my mother gave me. The sayings weren’t complicated, but they were helpful, such as “Remember when you were at your best. Now get there again!”

I likely inherited my love of one-liners from Mom. Her walls are full of them:

“Worry is the advance price you pay for troubles that may never come.”

“I asked God for all things that I might enjoy life. He gave me life that I might enjoy all things.”

The quotes of historical figures are never far from my consciousness.

Margaret Thatcher: “Being in power is a lot like being a woman. If you have to tell people you are, you aren’t.”

Mark Twain: “When I was fourteen, my old man was so stupid I could hardly stand to be around him. When I turned twenty-one, I was amazed at how much the old man had learned in just seven short years.”

Vince Lombardi: “Fatigue makes cowards of us all.”

I’m constantly on the lookout for new fodder, like this line lifted from my friend Steve Garrison’s email signature: “Think like a man of action; act like a man of thought.” Here are some other new discoveries:

“Give me six hours to chop down a tree and I will spend the first four sharpening the ax.” – Abraham Lincoln

“You can’t think your way into new ways of living. You must live your way into new ways of thinking.” – Richard Rohr

“Start by doing what is necessary, then what is possible, and suddenly you are doing the impossible.” – St. Francis of Assisi

And, finally, a great word for parents of small children on the power of trajectory: “If you’re an inch off on landing, no big deal. If you’re an inch off on takeoff, you miss the moon by a million miles.” – Neil Armstrong

Kevin Thompson writes regularly for The Boerne Star in the Texas hill country. He can be reached at kevin@kwt.info.

Advice for my college self

ACU

Giving unsolicited advice is usually a bad idea, unless you’re giving it to yourself.

I recently attended my 20th college reunion. I’ll save you the math: I’m 42.

I graduated in 1999, which now sounds more like a sale price than an actual year of history. Our class motto boldly stated, “The century saved the best for last.” Yes, that’s the best we could come up with.

As I strolled a campus I’ve visited only a handful of times since graduation, I contemplated what I would tell my college-age self, if I could, from my current vantage point aloft forty-two years of experience.

This is not a definitive list. If there’s anything you learn from four decades of life it’s that there’s not much definitive in this world.

Nonetheless, truth, wisdom and perspective are accessible. So, here’s what I’d say to that handsome young buck, in between his Sadie Hawkins dates, of course:

  1. You’re about to make life-altering choices. Don’t agonize over them. There are many right options and only a few wrong ones. Spend more time and energy making your decisions right than you do fretting over making the right decisions.
  2. Your life up until now has been marked by milestones. Tests, graduations, licenses, liberties. These clear-cut goals can lure you into thinking summits are the point. They’re not. Find joy in the journey. As your friend’s tattoo will one day read, “The journey is the destination.”
  3. You’ve been rewarded for achievement. Not since kindergarten have you been commended for sitting still. Accomplishments require activity and effort, and there’s a good lesson there about the value of work. But keep it in check. We’re human beings, not human doings. Do less; be more.
  4. It’s good to explore your passions, but people pay for skills. You’ll need some practical ones to support yourself and your family. Money is not everything; it is something.
  5. Don’t worry about what others think of you. Think for yourself, and don’t be consumed with pleasing others. People aren’t usually thinking about you anyway; they are mainly thinking about themselves.
  6. Build up your patience and perseverance. The best things in life require a long process. Weeds sprout up quickly, as Jesus pointed out, but they’re useless in scorching sunlight. A shady oak took years to grow from a single acorn.
  7. Life is a team sport and a group effort. Help others, and learn to ask for help yourself. Then, be humble enough to receive it. “Alone we go fast; together we go far,” business consultant Ed Krei says.
  8. Watch out for perfectionism. It will sabotage your plans and relationships. Pursue faithfulness and consistency instead. You’ve heard Jesus said, “Be perfect as my Heavenly Father is perfect.” According to one seminarian, a more accurate translation is, “Be whole as my Heavenly Father is whole.”
  9. An onslaught of distraction is coming; learn to focus. You think cable TV and America Online are time suckers…
  10. The older you get, the faster life will go. Don’t wait to start down the path you want to be on. But don’t rush. In fact, “ruthlessly eliminate hurry from your life,” Dallas Willard said. That’s good advice, as is this: Life is a marathon, not a sprint.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 206 other followers

Archives


%d bloggers like this: