Archive for July, 2018

New roads are worth the effort

Lajitas thermThe two hottest months of the year in Big Bend National Park are May and June. Don’t ask me why. My family and I found out the hard way.

Wanting a springtime, family-oriented, “off-the-grid” getaway, I booked a trip to Big Bend for Memorial Day weekend.

On the afternoon we arrived, the thermometer on the west-facing front porch of our vacation rental in Lajitas, Texas, read 120 degrees. That was as high as the thermometer went.

“It’s not that bad,” I explained to the kids. “It’s a dry heat. Plus, there’s a breeze.”

“It feels like we’re standing in front of a giant hair dryer,” one of them observed.

Fortunately, the Rio Grande was a stone’s throw away. And while I was initially concerned about water quality, the elements necessitated a swim across the border.

Mexican bovines met us on the other side. They didn’t mind the heat. They also provided an opportunity for more paternal perspective.

“See, look,” I told the kids. “At least you’re not wearing a black leather bodysuit.”

We spent the next three days taking on Big Bend’s classic hikes. The river trails were scorching. We took a dip in 105-degree hot springs to cool off after a pass through Boquillas Canyon.

The Chisos Mountain trails were doable thanks to a 20-degree temperature differential, but not without a lot of water and salty snacks.

During our 8-mile hike up Emory Peak, a question occurred to me, “As hard as it is to hike this trail, how much harder was it to build?”

I offered the question up to my kids. They nearly backed me off a ledge like I was Scar in The Lion King.

Trails, like roads, don’t happen by chance. They take planning, forethought, execution and effort. They require political will and determination driven by a desire for public good, both present and future.

Just like I’ve never heard the death-bed phrase, “I wish I’d spent more time at the office,” I’ve never heard, “I wish we never built that road.”

Unlike some government-funded “tragedies of the commons,” roads generally generate prosperity. They are usually utilized by a diversity of citizens.

In response to a joint request for help from Kendall County and the City of Boerne, the Texas Department of Transportation (TXDOT) spent two years and more than $1 million developing its Kendall Gateway Study.

Extensive citizen feedback was considered to determine ways to increase mobility in our fast-growing county. The data-driven plan is currently before Kendall County’s Commissioners Court and Boerne’s City Council. We need to get something out of the time and money spent.

I know it’s not easy. Someone’s backyard will have a line through it. We still need to put lines on the map, and sooner than later.

Construction won’t start on any proposed roadway for years. No TXDOT funding is yet on the table – and it never will be unless we start pushing for it through the Bexar County-dominated Metropolitan Planning Organization.

But we can’t start pushing for funding until local leaders put lines on a map.

Regional TXDOT Planning Director Jonathan Bean noted recently that Loop 337 around New Braunfels was first placed on a right-of-way map in the 1960s.

Very few people think that road – or any other road, for that matter – is a bad idea now.

 

Kevin Thompson writes frequently for The Boerne Star in the Texas hill country. Follow him at http://www.kwt.info.

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