Archive for June, 2018

Two cents’ worth on CVS

sach in black and white
A presentation to Boerne’s Historic Landmark Commission created a firestorm earlier this month. A friend suggested re-naming the group Historic Landmine Commission.

Following the presentation, a rumor spread fast: National pharmacy chain CVS is coming to the corner of Main Street and River Road.

The reality is many hoops of local government stand in CVS’s way. The Commission’s “discussion item” was miles away from a groundbreaking.

When I first heard of CVS going where a hole-in-the-wall barbecue joint stood for decades, the idea was anathema to me. I like my barbecue orders taken with a pencil and cut-up copy paper. Riverside Market was a brief stop in Mayberry.

Besides, where else could you buy nightcrawlers for the fish and white bread for the ducks of Cibolo Creek?

The Shell gas station / Riverside Market combination was not what tourism professionals would recommend for a gateway welcome center. But it was Boerne.

And it was also sold in 2012 by the Boerne family who had owned it for years. A San Antonio convenience store operator and then real estate investors have owned it since.

Boerne’s Main Street has long been filled with utility. People needed a livery stable and then automobile repair shops. They needed groceries, medicines, gas and places to stay and eat. All these sprang up at one time or another up and down Main Street from Riverside Market.

Directly across Main Street from Riverside, Sach’s Garage operated as the self-proclaimed “oldest garage in town.” City leaders recently referenced a black and white photo of the garage when the CVS developer asked what building type would fit Boerne’s historic district.

The developer presented renderings of a CVS Pharmacy styled like a 1940s garage to the Historic Landmark Commission two weeks ago. The drawings actually don’t look that bad. They look like an upscale CVS you’d see in Estes Park, CO, or Seaside, FL.

The outcry against CVS seems ubiquitous, but I haven’t heard what people want instead. The hole-in-the-wall is gone. Something else will be built. What should it be?

Public art sculptures? A museum? A gigantic Guadalupe bass with a six foot tall, wide-open mouth for tourists to take selfies in?

How about a restaurant with a deck overlooking Cibolo Creek? Several of those already exist within a stone’s throw of the site. A city park? There’s one across the street. A frozen yogurt shop? There’s one next door. A coffee shop and bakery? Try two doors down.

What about a boutique organic grocery or an outdoor gear outfitter?

Unfortunately, most of these ideas are not financially sustainable at this point. Like other businesses currently along Main, outside sources of income would be required for them to survive. For long-term prosperity, we need more economic viability, not less.

Other questions to ponder: How do we get dry goods and groceries to growing populations on the north and east sides of Boerne? Would it help traffic congestion to the south if we did? Would a series of smaller stores minimize the need for big boxes?

As for Main Street and River Road, an old-fashioned drugstore complete with diner-style grill and soda fountain milkshakes sounds good to me. If CVS will change its exterior to fit our historic district, maybe the pharmacy would retrofit its interior, too.

Kevin Thompson writes frequently for The Boerne Star. Follow him at www.kwt.info.

 

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Bucket List Includes Rock & Roll Show

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I admit I don’t have much of a bucket list, besides keeping the floors mopped until the kid spills decrease.

And while I was born in Music City the week Elvis died, I don’t consume a lot of new music. My older sons laugh at how few artists are in my repertoire.

And I definitely don’t think of myself as a rocker, unless it’s on the front porch.

Still, I consider one band iconic. While the group is labeled a rock band, its work cuts across genres and decades. With its latest release, the four-man act has had a Billboard chart-topping album in each of the last four decades.

My wife was a fan long before I. So, she wasn’t a tough sell when I asked her to rendezvous with…drumroll, please…U2. “I was going With or Without You,” she said.

U2’s sweeping anthems have captured generations of music lovers. The songs land the band on Super Bowl halftime shows and outsized music festivals. Think “I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For” and “Where the Streets Have No Name.”

U2’s current tour is called eXPERIENCE & iNNOCENCE. At the concert, we didn’t hear all the classics. We did experience the heart and soul of U2’s vision and its mastery of technology and artistry.

While U2 scales every rhythm and melody to entertain at the highest levels, its lyrics are what draw me in, particularly the Biblical allusions. Lead singer Paul David Hewson (a.k.a. “Bono”) pens them.

“See the bird with a leaf in her mouth, after the flood all the colors came out” (from Beautiful Day)

“You broke the bonds, and you loosened chains, carried the cross of my shame” (from I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For)

Historical references reflect how much attention these guys pay to the world around them. They are always on a mission and are deeply affected by human suffering.

“Sometimes, I wake at four in the morning when all the darkness is swarming, and it covers me in fear…Sometimes, I’m full of anger and grieving, so far away from believing that any song will reappear” (from The Little Things That Give You Away)

Bono’s honesty keeps U2 rolling, real and relevant. He connects grief and terror from his youth with events of today. The death of his mother and the 1972 shootings in Northern Ireland impacted his young innocence.

And now, through experience, Bono entreats Americans to restore the American soul. There’s even a song by that name.

On the new album, he writes, “The slaves are lookin’ for someone to lead them, the master’s lookin’ for someone to need him, the promised land is there for those who need it most, and Lincoln’s ghost said, ‘Get out of your own way.’”

“Free yourself to be yourself,” he encourages in the song, Lights of Home.

“I want to be useful,” Bono said recently in an interview with Rolling Stone. “That is our family prayer… It is not the most grandiose prayer. It is just, ‘we are available for work.’ That is U2’s prayer. We want to be useful, but we want to change the world. And we want to have fun at the same time.”

While making good music, Bono and company appear to be keeping the faith, just not to themselves.

 

Kevin Thompson can be reached at kevin@kwt.info.

Boerne has welcomed progress before

Land developers often use blank slates for their exploits. They build ground-up on large swaths of vacant property. Think Orlando, Florida, or The Woodlands north of Houston.

Boerne’s different. We have what some fast-developing areas don’t. In a word, we have history. History gives a deeper character that can make growth meaningful, inviting and attractive. Some places must build history around growth. Boerne can shape growth around its history.

Some local businesses are building on Boerne’s past. Cibolo Creek Brewing is bringing Main Street to life like Max Beseler’s “Metropolitan Saloon” did starting in 1891. The saloon occupied the building where The Daily Grind now brews coffee.

Long-time Boerne resident Tommy Mathews is doing something similar in the former Bergmann Lumber building. Tusculum Brewing is “coming soon.”

Down Blanco Road, local florist Urban Flowers occupies a 1951 wood frame structure that builders Robert Thornton and Travis Roberson preserved in their recent commercial revitalization of the Schwarz homestead.

These business leaders don’t see progress as a threat to quality of life. Neither did many of their predecessors.

In Historic Images of Boerne, Garland Perry republished a San Antonio Daily Express article from March 1878 describing the arrival of the San Antonio & Aransas Pass Railroad in Boerne.

According to the story, six hundred San Antonians “of almost every imaginable race, color, sex and previous condition of servitude” boarded seven passenger coaches destined for the “mountains” of Boerne.

Riders enjoyed Lone Star beer during the two-hour trip that whistled to a stop at the end of Theissen Street just passed “Cibolo falls,” a series of water chutes downstream from present-day Cibolo Nature Center.

The Boerne brass band played as guests disembarked. Dr. W.G. Kingsbury un-reluctantly welcomed guests to “our little hamlet of Boerne.”

Kingsbury was was once tasked by the governor of Texas to recruit settlers to the state. He had offices in St. Louis, Missouri, and London, England.

According to Kingsbury, it was “so great a luxury to inhale [the] mountain air” that even if guests didn’t eat, they “would go home tonight declaring it the grandest holiday.”

“But such is not our intention,” Kingsbury relieved the audience. “Old men, young men, saints, sinners, Democrats and Republicans” had joined up to organize a barbecue dinner for the guests. The arrival of the rail line had the Boerne-ites in a “state of excitement never witnessed.”

Boerne understood the benefits the iron horse would bring. Travel times to San Antonio would be cut significantly. Greater quantities of goods could be delivered and stored to meet demand. Twice-daily mail and newspaper service would deliver new knowledge.

Kingsbury compared the train’s arrival to the biblical return of the prodigal son:

Let mirth and joy abound.

We once were lost, but now are found.

Our hills are iron bound.

“Go kill the fatted calf,” he urged.

The Daily Express reporter summed up the day’s festivities this way: “Nobody seemed to want to come home…The town was in a frolic, and is liable to keep it up for a day or two longer…If you want to have a jolly time, go to Boerne.”

It doesn’t sound like “Boerne Texas Gone Forever” was charcoaled to the rear of any horse-drawn wagon on the grounds that day.

 

Kevin Thompson writes frequently for The Boerne Star in the Texas hill country. Follow him at http://www.kwt.info.


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