My philosophy on selling

Regardless of our respective occupations, we all sell something. It may simply be ourselves, our ideas, or our opinion on where to have dinner.

Selling is a fundamental part of life. Most people hate that idea.

Dating back to my first job at a fireworks stand, I have been selling.

“Might I interest you in these Morning Glory sparklers? They are ideal for small children because they have easy-to-light tissue paper wicks and longer handles to prevent burns. Plus, they change colors as they burn down!

“We buy them for half a cent each. I’ll part ways with this bundle of six for only seventeen ninety-nine.”

Okay, that last part wasn’t in the pitch. But let’s just say local fireworks vendor, “Mr. W,” might as well stand for “wealthy.”

Through years of studying and practicing the art of selling, I have assembled my philosophy on the topic. Here it goes.

Without energy, work ethic and determination, you’re dead on arrival. Energy isn’t everything, but it’s the impetus that gets everything else going. If you’re selling for a living, it helps to be heavily motivated by financial reward.

Sales is a numbers game. Play the percentages. The more at bats you get, the more hits (and home runs) will come, assuming your fundamentals are sound.

Organization is key. Work hard and smart. Daily routines are critical. “I only make cold calls when I feel like it, and I make sure I feel like it every morning at 9 am.” There’s no substitute for discipline.

Identify decision-makers. Qualify well. Probe. Ask the tough questions to figure out who can actually buy from you in a volume that makes your time worthwhile.

Persuade the supporting cast. Be diplomatic. Treat the receptionist like the CEO. Think politically. Smart decision-makers want buy-in from their key staff members.

Get to the root of the pain. Ask questions; listen well; understand process. Seek first to understand, then to be understood. Be interested before you try to be interesting.

Think relationship, not transaction. Figure out what’s important to your clients in business and in life. Add value in those areas through thoughtful conversations, business referrals and resources (articles, books, etc.). It will set you apart from other chatterboxes.

Keep your client’s best interest at heart. Argue against yourself if it’s what’s best for your customer. It will pay off… in the long run.

Trust takes time. Don’t give up. The first time you call on a prospect, you’re a stranger. The second time you’re an acquaintance. The third time you’re a friend. The fourth time you’re a friend he wants to do business with.

Prioritize benefits before features. People naturally think “WIIFM” … What’s in it for me? How will this make my life easier and more productive?

As successful politicians say, “Ask for the vote.” Ask for the sale directly. Press for a decision. Your prospect won’t be offended if you do. She’ll be offended if you don’t. She’ll think you think she’s not worth doing business with.

If you don’t believe in what you’re selling, move on to something you do. It’s impossible to fake it long enough to be successful.

At the end of the day, you’re not really selling. You’re helping. And everyone loves to be helped, especially with their sparkler selections.

 

Write to Kevin Thompson at kevin@kwt.info.

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2 Responses to “My philosophy on selling”


  1. 1 Bennye Waskom October 18, 2017 at 14:09

    Kevin, Lots of good information in an article concise enough for people to take the time to read. Liked it. Bennye

    _____

  2. 2 jessestroup October 18, 2017 at 22:03

    So true, so right, and the last line is funny and a very good writing form. Jesse Jesse Stroup Director of Spiritual Care

    JesseStrouplive@yahoo.com 6300 Harry Hines Blvd. BKB 101 Dallas, TX 75235 (888) 767-6363

    >


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